Serving-Up the ACE: Understanding Adverse Childhood Experiences (“ACE”) in Dependency Adoption Through the Lens of Social Science

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54 U. Mich. J. L. Reform Caveat

Cynthia G. Hawkins* and Taylor Scribner**

I. Introduction

The damage done to us during our childhood cannot be undone, since we cannot change anything in our past. We can, however, change ourselves. We can repair ourselves and gain our lost integrity by choosing to look more closely at the knowledge that is stored inside our bodies and bringing this closer to our awareness. This path, although certainly not easy, is the only route by which we can leave behind the cruel, invisible prison of our childhood. We become free by transforming ourselves from unaware victims of the past into responsible individuals in the present, who are aware of our past and are thus able to live with it.1

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“Dispossessing Detroit” Videos

We hope you were able to join us for “Dispossessing Detroit”! The JLR team was thrilled to host a wonderful day of engaging sessions and conversation.

Recordings of each talk can be found below. We hope you’ll re-watch your favorite parts and let these questions continue to challenge you!

Property Dispossession is Nothing New: A Historical Overview
Panel discussion on the historical instances of land dispossession experienced by people living in the Detroit area and more broadly.

  • Bernadette AtuaheneProfessor of Law, Chicago-Kent College of Law
  • Beryl SatterProfessor of History, Rutgers University-Newark
  • Louise SeamsterAssistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology and African American Studies, University of Iowa
  • Michael WitgenDirector of the Native American Studies, Program and Associate Professor of History and American Culture, University of Michigan

Municipal Bankruptcy: Who Gets What?
Panel discussion comparing the experiences of Detroit, Puerto Rico, and Harrisburg, PA and the citizens who call these places home during and after bankruptcy proceedings.

  • Michelle AndersonProfessor of Law, Stanford Law School
  • Juliet MoringielloAssociate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Professor of Law, Widener University, Commonwealth Law School
  • John PottowJohn Philip Dawson Collegiate Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School
  • David SkeelS. Samuel Arsht Professor of Corporate Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School 

Dispossession in Other Forms: A Closer Look at Detroit 

Right of Refusal 

  • Michele OberholtzerDirector of Tax Foreclosure Prevention, United Community Housing Coalition 
  • Eli SavitSenior Advisor to Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan

Changes in the Detroit Real Estate Market

  • Joshua AkersAssistant Professor of Geography and Urban & Regional Studies, University of Michigan-Dearborn

MorningSide v. Sabree: The Tax Foreclosure Crisis

How Data Informs Policy

No video available

Ramifications of Dispossession: Activism and Lived Experiences
A panel discussion addressing the ways dispossession has affected community members and activists. 

  • Sonja Bonnet, Community Legal Worker, Detroit Justice Center
  • David Pitawanakwat, J.D. Candidate, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law and University of Windsor Faculty of Law  
  • Simone Sagovac, Southwest Detroit Community Benefits Coalition

Revitalization Today: Urban Renewal and Eminent Domain
Panel discussion on the role of revitalization efforts in cities throughout the country. 

Closing Remarks
Small group discussions with speakers and participants discussing reforms to current issues of land dispossession. Small groups will reconvene to report possible reforms.

Special thanks to Shawn Deloach for AV assistance!

“Dispossessing Detroit”: Learn More and Full Schedule

Hear from the Symposium team’s Nathan Santoscoy, Michigan Law student and Detroit native, about tax foreclosure crisis in Detroit and some of the conversations we’ll be having at our Symposium on Nov. 9:

Learn more about the Detroit story that will be our lens for conversation at “Dispossessing Detroit.”

The full schedule is below. If you have not yet RSVP’ed, we encourage you to do so soon: https://dispossessingdetroitsymposium.com/rsvp-comment/

We’re excited to see you there!

Symposium: Saturday, Nov. 9, 2019
8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. @ Michigan Law School

Hutchins Hall | 701 S. State St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109

Continental Breakfast and Check-In
8:00 – 8:30 AM | Main Floor Lobby, outside of Hutchins 100

Property Dispossession is Nothing New: A Historical Overview
8:30 – 9:30 AM
Panel discussion on the historical instances of land dispossession experienced by people living in the Detroit area and more broadly.

  • Bernadette AtuaheneProfessor of Law, Chicago-Kent College of Law
  • Beryl SatterProfessor of History, Rutgers University-Newark
  • Louise SeamsterAssistant Professor of Sociology and Criminology and African American Studies, University of Iowa
  • Michael WitgenDirector of the Native American Studies, Program and Associate Professor of History and American Culture, University of Michigan

Municipal Bankruptcy: Who Gets What?
9:35 – 10:35 AM
Panel discussion comparing the experiences of Detroit, Puerto Rico, and Harrisburg, PA and the citizens who call these places home during and after bankruptcy proceedings.

  • Michelle AndersonProfessor of Law, Stanford Law School
  • Juliet MoringielloAssociate Dean for Research and Faculty Development and Professor of Law, Widener University, Commonwealth Law School
  • John PottowJohn Philip Dawson Collegiate Professor of Law, University of Michigan Law School
  • David SkeelS. Samuel Arsht Professor of Corporate Law, University of Pennsylvania Law School 

Dispossession in Other Forms: A Closer Look at Detroit 
10:45 – 12:15 PM
Short presentations or conversations on various topics. Each conversation will be limited to 15-20 minutes with 5 minutes for audience questions and will be held three times over the course of an hour and a half. 

  • Right of Refusal
    • 10:45- 11:10 AM; 11:15- 11:40 AM; 11:45- 12:10 PM
    • Speakers: Michele OberholtzerDirector of Tax Foreclosure Prevention, United Community Housing Coalition and Eli SavitSenior Advisor to Detroit Mayor Mike Duggan
  • Changes in the Detroit Real Estate Market 
    • 10:45- 11:10 AM; 11:15- 11:40 AM; 11:45- 12:10 PM
    • Speaker: Joshua AkersAssistant Professor of Geography and Urban & Regional Studies, University of Michigan-Dearborn
  • MorningSide v. Sabree: The Tax Foreclosure Crisis
    • 10:45- 11:10 AM; 11:15- 11:40 AM; 11:45- 12:10 PM
    • Speaker: Michael SteinbergProfessor from Practice, University of Michigan Law School 
  • How Data Informs Policy
    • 10:45- 11:10 AM; 11:15- 11:40 AM; 11:45- 12:10 PM
    • Speaker: Jerry Paffendorf, Co-Founder & CEO, LOVELAND Technologies

Lunch
12:15 – 1:15 PM

Ramifications of Dispossession: Activism and Lived Experiences
1:15 PM – 2:15 PM
A panel discussion addressing the ways dispossession has affected community members and activists. 

  • Sonja Bonnet, Community Legal Worker, Detroit Justice Center
  • David Pitawanakwat, J.D. Candidate, University of Detroit Mercy School of Law and University of Windsor Faculty of Law  
  • Simone Sagovac, Southwest Detroit Community Benefits Coalition

Revitalization Today: Urban Renewal and Eminent Domain
2:30 – 4:00 PM
Panel discussion on the role of revitalization efforts in cities throughout the country. 

Dispossession Reform Round Tables
4:00 – 4:45 PM
Small group discussions with speakers and participants discussing reforms to current issues of land dispossession. Small groups will reconvene to report possible reforms.

Closing Remarks
4:45 – 5:00 PM
Small group discussions with speakers and participants discussing reforms to current issues of land dispossession. Small groups will reconvene to report possible reforms.

Detroit Engagement Day: Sunday, Nov. 10, 2019
10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. @ Detroit

Volume 52 Issue 4 Summer 2019

Foreword
Jeffrey Levicki
Does a Non-Extreme Answer to Extremism Exist (pdf)

Keynote Address
Sammy Rangel
Keynote Address (pdf)

Symposium Article
Leonard M. Niehoff
Policing Hate Speech and Extremism: A Taxonomy of Arguments in Opposition (pdf)

Symposium Essays
Rebecca J. Marston
Guilt by Alt-Association: A Review of Enhanced Punishment for Suspected Gang Members (pdf)

Anna C. Williford
Blurred Lines: What is Extremism (pdf)

Symposium Transcript
Khaled Beydoun, Nina Mozeihem, & Samuel Bagenstos
Interview with Khaled Beydoun (pdf)

Notes
Emily S.P. Baxter
Protecting Local Authority in State Constitutions and Challenging Intrastate Preemption (pdf)

Christian H. Robertson II
Different Problems Require Different Solutions: How Air Warfare Norms Should Inform IHL Targeting Law Reform and Cyber Warfare (pdf)

Volume 52, Issue 3 Spring 2019

Articles

Eli Savit
States Empowering Plaintiff Cities (pdf)

Kit Kinports
The Quantum of Suspicion Needed for an Exigent Circumstances Search (pdf)

Paul David Stern
Tort Justice Reform (pdf)

Charles Aside III
The Innocent Villain: Involuntary Manslaughter by Text (pdf)

Notes

Kara Naseef
How to Decrease the Immigration Backlog: Expand Representation and End Unnecessary Detention (pdf)

Megan C. Anderson
21st Century Cures Act: The Problem With Preemption in Light of Deregulation (pdf)

Volume 52, Issue 2 Winter 2019

Articles

Carl T. Bogus
Books and Olive Oil: Why Antitrust Must Deal with Consolidated Corporate Power (pdf)

Theresa A. Vogel
Critiquing Matter of A-B-: An Uncertain Future in Asylum Proceedings for Women Fleeing Intimate Partner Violence (pdf)

Wayne Batchis
The Political Party System as a Public Forum: The Incoherence of Parties as Free Speech Associations and a Proposed Correction (pdf)

Ying Hu
Robot Criminals (pdf)

Notes

Julie Aust
Switching Employers in a Working World: American Immigrants and the Revocation Notice Problem (pdf)

Nicholas Karp
This We’ll Defend: Expanding UCMJ Article 2 Subject Matter Jurisdiction as a Response to Nonconsensual Distribution of Illicit Photographs (pdf)

Announcing JLR’s 2017 Symposium: “Stemming the Breach: Cybersecurity Reform for the 21st Century”

The Michigan Journal of Law Reform is pleased to announce that its 2017 Symposium, “Stemming the Breach: Cybersecurity Reform for the 21st Century,” will take place on February 11, 2017 in Michigan Law School’s South Hall, 625 South State St. Ann Arbor, MI.

The 2017 Symposium will run from approximately 9 A.M. to 5 P.M. and will feature the following panels and panelists:

Civil Liberties: featuring Marcy Wheeler, G.S. Hans, and Harley Geiger

Corporations: featuring Scott Shackelford, Ari Schwartz, and Alan Butler

National Security: featuring Harvey Rishikof, Cindy Cohn, and Ahmed Ghappour

The 2017 Symposium’s Key Note Address will be delivered by Former Congressman Mike Rogers

RSVP

A detailed schedule of the 2017 Symposium may be found here.

For more information on the Symposium, please contact Peri Tenenbaum, Managing Symposium Editor, at perilten@umich.edu.

Drawing (Gad)flies: Thoughts on the Uses (or Uselessness) of Legal Scholarship

Sherman J. Clark*

49 U. Mich. J. L. Reform Caveat 63 (pdf)

In this essay, I argue that law schools should continue to encourage and support wide-ranging legal scholarship, even if much of it does not seem to be of immediate use to the legal profession. I do not emphasize the relatively obvious point that scholarship is a process through which we study the law so that we can ultimately make useful contributions. Here, rather, I make two more-subtle points. First, legal academics ought to question the priorities of the legal profession, rather than merely take those priorities as given. We ought to serve as Socratic gadflies—challenging rather than merely mirroring regnant assumptions about what ought to matter in and to the law. Second, the freedom to serve this role is a large part of what attracts people capable of doing so to academic life. If we were to insist that legal scholars think about only those things that already matter to the legal profession, we would not attract the people we most need—people willing and able to help us rethink our assumptions about what ought to matter.

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