“Immigration Reform at 50”: Participants and Keynote Speaker Announced

The Michigan Journal of Law Reform is proud to announce the participants and keynote speaker for its 2015 Symposium, Immigration Reform at 50. The symposium will take place at the University of Michigan Law School on Saturday, February 7th 2015 and will run from 8:30am to 5:30pm.

For more information on the symposium, please contact Kate Aufses, Managing Symposium Editor of the Michigan Journal of Law Reform, at kwaufses@umich.edu, or visit the JLR Symposium Website.

Participants:

Kate Andrias, Michigan Law School
Deborah Anker, Harvard Law School
Sabrineh Ardalan, Harvard Law School
Nicholas Bagley, Michigan Law School
Howard Chang, University of Pennsylvania Law School
Fernando Chang-Muy, University of Pennsylvania Law School
Gabriel “Jack” Chin, University of California, Davis, School of Law
Ingrid Eagly, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law
Lee Gelernt, ACLU Immigrant Rights Project
Melissa Crow, American Immigration Council
P. Deep Gulasekaram, Santa Clara University School of Law
Lucas Guttentag, U.S. Citizen and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security*
Margaret Hu, Washington & Lee University School of Law
Kevin Johnson, Dean, University of California, Davis, School of Law
Michael Kagan, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, William S. Boyd School of Law
Stephen Legomsky, Washington University St. Louis School of Law
Hiroshi Motomura, University of California, Los Angeles, School of Law
John Sandweg, Frontier Solutions
Margo Schlanger, Michigan Law School
Rick Su, State University of New York at Buffalo Law School
Daniel Tichenor, University of Oregon
Philip Torrey, Harvard Law School
Michael Wishnie, Yale Law School
* Keynote Speaker

Keynote Speaker: Lucas Guttentag

Professor Guttentag recently began serving the Obama Administration as Senior Counselor to the Leon Rodriguez, Director of U.S. and Immigration Services, a component of the Department of Homeland Security. Prior to this appointment, Professor Guttentag was a professor at both Stanford and Yale Law Schools, where he taught courses in immigration law, constitutional litigation, migration policy, and the intersection of civil rights and immigration law.

Professor Guttentag is a founder and former national director of the American Civil Liberties Union Immigrants’ Rights Project, which he led from 1985 to 2011. Over the past thirty years, he has represented immigrants in class action and constitutional cases before the U.S. Supreme Court, many federal circuit courts, and federal district courts. In 2001, he argued successfully before the Supreme Court to establish the right of immigrants to independent federal judicial review of administrative deportation orders. He has also challenged the indefinite detention of Haitian refugees at Guantanamo Naval Base, a federal law penalizing citizens and immigrants who marry during deportation hearings, and many state and local immigration laws.

Professor Guttentag received his JD cum laude from Harvard Law School (1978), his AB with honors from the University of California Berkeley (1973), and he served as law clerk to Judge William Wayne Justice in Texas.

“Immigration Reform at 50”: Symposium Schedule Announced

A tentative schedule of events has been announced for the Michigan Journal of Law Reform‘s 2015 Symposium, Immigration Reform at 50:

Friday, February 6th, 2015
Participants arrive
7:00PM: Welcome dinner for panelists, Michigan Law faculty participants, and JLR Executive Board members

Saturday, February 7th, 2015
8:00AM: Registration and breakfast
8:30AM: Opening Remarks by Kate Aufses, Managing Symposium Editor of the Journal of Law Reform, and Margo Schlanger, Professor of Law, Michigan Law School
9:00AM: Opening Remarks by Daniel Tichenor, Philip H. Knight Chair of Social Science at the University of Oregon
9:15AM – 10:45AM: Panel — Executive Action and Inaction: Social Movement Successes and Failures
11:00AM – 12:30PM: Panel — Crimmigration: The Conflation of Immigration Enforcement and Criminal Justice
12:30PM – 1:30PM: Lunch and Keynote Address by Lucas Guttentag
1:45PM – 3:15PM: Panel — States, Localities, and Immigration (Non)enforcement
3:30PM – 4:45PM: Panel — Immigration’s Humanitarian Crises and Responses
5:00PM – 5:15PM: Closing Remarks by Stephen Legomsky, Washington University Law School
5:15PM: Reception in Jeffries Lounge, South Hall, Michigan Law School

For more information on the symposium, please contact Kate Aufses, Managing Symposium Editor of the Michigan Journal of Law Reform, at kwaufses@umich.edu, and visit the JLR Symposium website.

MJLR Symposium on Immigration Reform will take place on February 7th

The Michigan Journal of Law Reform is excited to announce its 2015 Symposium, Immigration Reform at 50. The symposium will take place on Saturday, February 7th, 2015 at Michigan Law School in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The event will run through the day, from 8:30AM to 5:30PM. The Symposium will consist of four roundtable discussions on a wide array of topics relating to developments in immigration reform. A keynote speaker will present over lunch. All of the day’s events will take place in Room 1225 of Michigan Law School’s South Hall, which is located on Monroe Street between State and Oakland Streets in downtown Ann Arbor. We look forward to seeing you there!

For more information about the 2015 JLR Symposium, please contact Kate Aufses, Managing Symposium Editor of the Michigan Journal of Law Reform, at kwaufses@umich.edu, or visit the MJLR Symposium Website.

American passport

2014 Symposium Video Links

On Saturday, February 22, 2014, the University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform hosted its Symposium, “Affirmative Action and School Diversity after Fisher v. Texas.” Below are links to video of the four panels as well as the keynote address. Enjoy!

Panel 1: Exhaustion, Race Neutral Alternatives, and the Future of Affirmative Action Litigation

Panel 2: The Efficacy of Race Neutral Alternatives in Increasing On-Campus Diversity

Keynote Address: Brown at Sixty: The Quiet and Premature Death of a Beloved Icon

Panel 3: Competing Social Science on the Benefits of Race Conscious Affirmative Action Programs

Panel 4: Challenges to Diversity in the K-12 Context

Saturday, February 22: Affirmative Action and School Diversity After Fisher v. Texas

The University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform proudly invites you to its Symposium, “Affirmative Action and School Diversity after Fisher v. Texas,” which will take place on Saturday, February 22, at 1225 South Hall, 701 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Panel titles are listed below. For more information, please see the flyer at the bottom of the page.

Panel 1 – Exhaustion, Race Neutral Alternatives, and the Future of Affirmative Action Litigation (9:00-10:40 A.M.)

Panel 2 – The Efficacy of Race Neutral Alternatives in Increasing On-Campus Diversity (10:50-12:30 P.M.)

Keynote Address – Brown at Sixty: The Quiet and Premature Death of a Beloved Icon (12:45-1:30 P.M.)

Panel 3 – Competing Social Science on the Benefits of Race Conscious Affirmative Action Programs (1:45-3:15 P.M.)

Panel 4 – Challenges to Diversity in the K-12 Context (3:30-5:00 P.M.)

MJLR Symposium Flyer 2014

Affirmative Action and School Diversity After Fisher v. Texas

The University of Michigan Journal of Law Reform proudly invites you to its Symposium, “Affirmative Action and School Diversity after Fisher v. Texas,” which will take place on Saturday, February 22, at 1225 South Hall, 701 S. State Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109.

Panel titles are listed below. For more information, please see the flyer at the bottom of the page.

Panel 1 – Exhaustion, Race Neutral Alternatives, and the Future of Affirmative Action Litigation (9:00-10:40 A.M.)

Panel 2 – The Efficacy of Race Neutral Alternatives in Increasing On-Campus Diversity (10:50-12:30 P.M.)

Keynote Address – Brown at Sixty: The Quiet and Premature Death of a Beloved Icon (12:45-1:30 P.M.)

Panel 3 – Competing Social Science on the Benefits of Race Conscious Affirmative Action Programs (1:45-3:15 P.M.)

Panel 4 – Challenges to Diversity in the K-12 Context (3:30-5:00 P.M.)

MJLR Symposium Flyer 2014

Volume 46, Issue 4 Summer 2013

Aside

mjlr_issue_banner_464ARTICLES

Robert G. Bone
Walking the Class Action Maze: Toward a More Functional Rule 23 (PDF)

Catherine M. Sharkey
The Future of Class Wide Punitive Damages (PDF)

David Korn & David Rosenberg
Concepcion‘s Pro-Defendant Biasing of the Arbitration Process: The Class Counsel Solution (PDF)

Janet Cooper Alexander
To Skin a Cat: Qui Tam Actions  as a State Legislative Response to Concepcion (PDF)

Cindy A Schipani & Terry Morehead Dworkin
Class Action Litigation After Dukes: In Search of a Remedy for Gender Discrimination in Employment (PDF)

Patrick M. Hanlon
An Experiment in Law Reform: Amchem Products v. Windsor (PDF)

Dana M. Muir, Junhai Liu, and Haiyan Xu
The Future of Securities Class Actions Against Foreign Companies: China and Comity Concerns (PDF)

NOTE

Max Hensley
Power to the People: Why we Need Full Federal Preemption of Electrical Transmission Regulation (PDF)

Why American Express v. Italian Colors Does Not Matter and Coordinated Pursuit of Aggregate Claims May Be a Viable Option After Concepcion

Gregory C. Cook*

2 U. Mich. J.L. Reform 104A

This Comment suggests that the upcoming decision by the Supreme Court in American Express Co. v. Italian Colors Restaurant1 will not change the class action landscape. While the plaintiff bar contends that certain public policy goals will be lost as a result of American Express and AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion,2 this Comment argues that, in the correct circumstances, coordinated individual arbitrations can address at least some of these public policy goals and plaintiff counsel should focus on such coordination efforts (including, for instance, ethically recruiting actually-injured plaintiffs, the use of common plaintiff counsel, the use of common experts, and shared discovery).

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Audio Tapes: Class-Action Reform Symposium

Class-Actions and Damages Panel

Featuring: Patrick Hanlon (Stanford Law School), Catherine Sharkey (New York University Law School), John Beisner (Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom), David Santacroce (University of Michigan Law School), and moderated by Richard Friedman (University of Michigan Law School).

Class-Actions and Arbitration Panel

Featuring: Brian Fitzpatrick (Vanderbilt Law School), Linda Mullenix (Texas Law School), David Rosenberg (Harvard Law School), Jeffrey Greenbaum (Sills Cummis & Gross),  Maria Glover (Georgetown University Law Center), Gregory Cook (Balch & Bingham), Janet Alexander (Stanford Law School), Hiro Aragaki (Loyola Law School), Brian Murray (Jones Day), and moderated by Margaret Jane Radin (University of Michigan Law School).

Securities Class Actions Panel

Featuring: Dana Muir (University of Michigan Ross School of Business), Catherine Barrad (Sidley Austin), James Cox (Duke Law School), Randall Thomas (Vanderbilt Law School), and moderated by Adam Pritchard (University of Michigan Law School).

Rule 23 Panel

Featuring: Robert Bone (Texas Law School), Linda Mullinex (Texas Law School), Steven Ellis (Goodwin Procter), Daniel Girard (Girard Gibbs), and moderated by Ed Cooper (University of Michigan Law School).

Lunch Keynote

Featuring: Cindy Schipani (University of Michigan Ross School of Business), Terry Dworkin (Indiana University).

Cruises, Class Actions, and the Court

David Korn and David Rosenberg*

2 U. Mich. J.L. Reform A96

As the Carnival Triumph debacle splashed across the national consciousness,1 lawyers shook their heads. Sensationalist news coverage exposed common knowledge in the legal community: cruise passengers have little recourse against carriers, and, as a result, they often bear the brunt of serious physical and financial injuries. Cruise lines, escaping legal accountability for their negligence, sail off undeterred from neglecting passenger safety on future voyages.2 While its previous decisions helped entrench this problem, a recently argued case presents the Supreme Court with another opportunity to address it.3

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